Kentrosaurus

Kentrosaurus

Kentrosaurus aethiopicus was a cousin of the Stegosaurus which lived in Africa during the late Jurassic period, around 155-150 million years ago. It stood out from its North American cousin by having narrower plates, a greater number of spikes on its tail, and then a pair of large spikes sticking out of its shoulder. It was also a lot smaller, weighing little more than a single ton (whereas Stegosaurus could grow between five and seven tons).
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Cryolophosaurus

Cryolophosaurus

Cryolophosaurus ellioti was a large theropod dinosaur that stalked Antarctica during the Early Jurassic, around 194 to 188 million years ago. Back then, the continent would have been covered by temperate forests as a result of the warmer global climate. The distinctive pompadour-like crest on Cryolophosaurus’s head has inspired the nickname “Elvisaurus” for this dinosaur.

Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur

Moon Girl and Devil DinosaurThis is my interpretation of Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur from Marvel Comics. When their comic came out a couple of years back, I remember liking the idea of a female protagonist of color joining forces with a Tyrannosaurus rex, but wasn’t so crazy about taking Devil Dinosaur out of his native jungle and dropping him into modern times. So for my take on the duo, I decided to make Moon Girl a prehistoric/tribal twentysomething instead of the modern-day nerdy kid portrayed in the comics. Or, this could be her once she gets older and decides to move with Devil back to his original habitat.

Dinosaurs in Prehistoric Fiction

One fact I’ve observed while looking up the prehistoric fiction genre is that surprisingly very little of it seems to feature any dinosaurs.

Of course, the fantasy of prehistoric humans (or “cavemen”) coexisting with non-avian dinosaurs has appeared in numerous movies, cartoons, and comic books. But if you look at prose literature with prehistoric human characters, dinosaurs and other Mesozoic fauna appear to be absent altogether. Instead the majority of prehistoric fiction novels, such as Jean M. Auel’s Clan of the Cave Bear or Steven Barnes’s Great Sky Woman, try to represent the prehistoric human experience more or less realistically. Literary equivalents to One Million Years BC or When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth are few and far between.

(There are the ape-like hominins in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Lost World, of course, but that doesn’t really count as “prehistoric fiction” since it’s really an isolated lost world surviving into the late Victorian era.)

Now, I don’t necessarily have a problem with realistic prehistoric fiction. I actually enjoyed the portrayal of prehistoric African foragers and their world in Great Sky Woman quite a lot. However, I’m also a longtime dinosaur fan, and I see a lot of potential in the cavemen-and-dinosaurs brand of prehistoric fantasy that I think more authors should exploit. Instead they seem to have left it for the filmmakers and comic book artists. What’s up with that?

Cretaceous Jungle

Cretaceous Jungle

Deep in a Cretaceous jungle where dinosaurs roam free, this primitive bird is stretching its wings while perched on a mossy tree branch. It’s probably one of the Enantiornithes, which thrived throughout the Cretaceous Period before becoming extinct along with all the non-avian dinosaurs.

Mostly I drew this scene to sharpen my skills at drawing jungles some more.

Neighborhood Stroll

Neighborhood Stroll

This huntress is taking a stroll through her neighborhood, with her hunting spear in hand and a machete on her thigh. Hey, if you lived in a jungle where dinosaurs roamed wild, you’d opt for open-carry too.

The dinosaurs in the background are a Triceratops and a generic microraptorine (the flying bird-like one).

Yehuecauhceratops

Yehuecauhceratops

Yehuecauhceratops mudei was a ceratopsian dinosaur that roamed Mexico around 72 million years ago, during the late Cretaceous period. Though known only from fragmentary remains, these are enough to show it was relatively small, with a length around three meters (or less than ten feet). But I have to say it has one of the most challenging names to spell of any ceratopsian species thus identified.