Hatshepsut Returns

Hatshepsut Returns

After Cleopatra VII, Hatshepsut (1507-1453 BC) is perhaps the best known of ancient Egypt’s small number of female rulers. Without a doubt, she’s also been my favorite Pharaoh to draw, male or female, in large part because of my weakness for strong and sexy women (in case you haven’t already figured that out). By the way, the collection of symbols in the upper left corner of the picture represent Hatshepsut’s official cartouche.

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Tyrannosaurus rex Poster

Tyrannosaurus rex Poster

Here is an 11×17′’ educational poster starring the Tyrannosaurus rex, the last of the great reptiles and the king of them all. Perfect for decorating the room of anyone who loves dinosaurs, young and old alike!

You can buy your own printed copy on Redbubble here.

A Classic Cretaceous Clash

A Classic Cretaceous Clash

68 million years ago in the jungles of late Cretaceous North America, a hungry Tyrannosaurus rex battles its arch-nemesis (and favorite prey) Triceratops horridus. From the cover of some nearby undergrowth, a small troodontid dinosaur watches with the expectation that whomever wins, the loser will become carrion to feast on.

By the way, this is my retake on an earlier battle scene I did between T. rex and Triceratops earlier in 2018, since I wasn’t quite happy with the original.

Snow White

Snow White

I’ve never cared for the Snow White fairy tale, in no small part because the Disney adaptation frightened me as a child. Nonetheless, the traditional description of Snow White as pale-skinned with dark hair and red lips made me think of a woman from Japan, and so that’s how I chose to interpret the character. The fruit she’s carrying in her hand is a “Japanese apple” (actually native to China) which resembles a tomato in shape but is supposed to taste really sweet.

Marshall and Covington

Elias Marshall and Philip J. Covington

Here are two more characters from my recently completed sci-fi story (the same one with Big Ben the Brontosaurus and Charlotte Elanora). On the left is Elias Marshall, an old Texan dude who likes to dress in all white (even down to his revolver and its holster) and is the curator of the Global Museum of Petroleum and Energy. This museum was basically set up to promote a controversial new oil pipeline across Texas, and it’s the one where Big Ben is being exhibited as their climactic attraction.

The taller, younger dude to the right is Philip J. Covington, a London-raised Englishman who is the CEO of Global Petroleum, Inc., the corporation that owns the new museum. He comes over to inspect the place when it’s about to open, but suffice to say he’ll get himself (and his whole company) in even greater ruin than he could ever imagine.

Dilophosaurus Doodle

Dilophosaurus Doodle

Quick pencil doodle of Dilophosaurus wetherilli, a theropod dinosaur from the Early Jurassic around 193 million years ago. There’s no evidence that this animal had a frill or could spit venom as portrayed in the Jurassic Parkfranchise, but it would have still been quite a powerful predator for its time (it weighed in around 400 kg, or 880 lbs).

Blue

Blue

I did this quick portrait of Blue the Velociraptor from Jurassic World after watching that movie again, this time to prep for the upcoming Fallen Kingdom sequel. JW still scores a solid 8/10 in my book, even if it could never be as technologically groundbreaking as the original Jurassic Park. So far, Fallen Kingdom has been getting mixed reviews from the critics on Rotten Tomatoes, but I’m looking forward to it nonetheless.

Chinese Warrior with Fire Lance

Chinese Warrior with Fire Lance

The weapon that this soldier from ancient China is holding is a fire lance, one of the earliest gunpowder weapons invented in recorded history. These were spear-like weapons with fireworks attached that would shoot out projectiles or poison when lit, and they would have been used in close-quarters combat due to their limited range. Nonetheless, Chinese fire lances would have represented one of the very first stages of the modern firearm’s evolution.

Allosaurus Attacks Stegosaurus

Allosaurus Attacks Stegosaurus

Out on the Late Jurassic savannas, an Allosaurus fragilis attacks a Stegosaurus ungulatus. If the allosaur is going to bring the seven-ton plant-eater down, it must confront its prey’s formidable tail spikes (collectively referred to as a thagomizer, after the late Thag Simmons).

In fact, we have fossil evidence from a wound marked on an allosaur’s pubic bone that such confrontations between the Allosaurus and Stegosaurus actually would have taken place. Apparently, a stegosaur’s tail spike had struck the allosaur in the crotch, leaving behind an injury that became infected and killed the predator.