Swordswoman

Swordswoman

This is a doodle of an African swordswoman character, with strong Egyptian and Kushite influences in her design (the sword she’s carrying is called a khopesh). I wanted to draw a swordswoman like this after seeing the new Wonder Woman movie, but I chose to make her a character of my own creation rather than actually having her be Wonder Woman (though I am aware that, in the comics, Wonder Woman had an African twin sister named Nubia). Drawing racebent versions of established characters can be fun, but in the end you can do so much more with your own characters than someone else’s.

And this is the penciled version:

Swordswoman Pencils

The whole piece started as sketchy line art which I scanned in for digital inking and coloring, but then I returned to the original line art and shaded it in the old-fashioned way. Personally I think digital coloring tends to imbue the subject with extra life (especially if they have a lot of jewelry and patterned clothing on), but pencil shading can be a fun way to pass the time, and I really like how my characters’ skin comes out once I go over it with a blending stump.

Casablanca Beauty

Casablanca Beauty

This came to mind after watching a Youtube review of the 1940s film Casablanca (set in the Moroccan city of the same name). I dunno if there were many African-American female visitors to Casablanca at that time, but the movie does have an African-American male supporting character named Sam who works as a pianist, so maybe it’s not too far-fetched either. Also, I had to work through a small creative block.

Alert and Ready

Alert and Ready

This huntress has heard the subtle crack of a twig with her keen hearing. It might be nothing more than a random falling branch, or it could be a hungry dinosaur prowling through the jungle. Either way, she has to be alert and ready at all times.

I wanted to do another “jungle girl” picture after listening to the music track “Jungle Girl” by Brandon and Derek Fiechter on Youtube. I strongly encourage you to check out these guys’ Youtube channel if you like listening to music with different cultural inspirations.

Ma’at the Goddess of Justice

Ma'at the Goddess of Justice

In the ancient Egyptian worldview, Ma’at was a concept representing truth, justice, and order in the universe. It formed the basis of morality that every Egyptian citizen had to follow and every Pharaoh had to uphold. Sometimes the Egyptians would represent Ma’at as a goddess wearing an ostrich feather under her headband. This feather was a symbol of truth against which the hearts of the dead would be weighed on a scale; only if the heart weighed less than the feather could the dead enter the afterlife.

Hathor

Hathor

Hathor, the Egyptian goddess of love, beauty, and fertility, takes a stroll amidst the fields of Aaru (which was essentially the Egyptian conception of heaven). The staff she’s carrying is called a was-scepter, and it’s believed to represent power and authority. Both gods and kings could be portrayed as wielding the was-scepter in Egyptian art.