Ma’at the Goddess of Justice

Ma'at the Goddess of Justice

In the ancient Egyptian worldview, Ma’at was a concept representing truth, justice, and order in the universe. It formed the basis of morality that every Egyptian citizen had to follow and every Pharaoh had to uphold. Sometimes the Egyptians would represent Ma’at as a goddess wearing an ostrich feather under her headband. This feather was a symbol of truth against which the hearts of the dead would be weighed on a scale; only if the heart weighed less than the feather could the dead enter the afterlife.

Hathor

Hathor

Hathor, the Egyptian goddess of love, beauty, and fertility, takes a stroll amidst the fields of Aaru (which was essentially the Egyptian conception of heaven). The staff she’s carrying is called a was-scepter, and it’s believed to represent power and authority. Both gods and kings could be portrayed as wielding the was-scepter in Egyptian art.

African-American

African-American

Both this woman’s design and her background are supposed to represent the fundamentally dual heritage that the African-American people have. One part of it is rooted in Africa (most of all West Africa) and the other in the culture that developed in the United States of America. The amulet hanging from the woman’s necklace is a cross between an American star, an Egyptian ankh, and a West African adinkra symbol for freedom and emancipation.

Defender of the Lost Oasis

Defender of the Lost Oasis

This young warrior comes from a kingdom of great antiquity hidden within the Sahara Desert of Libya. When the Nazis come knocking on their door in 1940,seeking their most treasured possessions,  it is she who must defend her people with all the courage and ferocity she can muster.

As of now I don’t have a name for the character (or her kingdom) yet, but I imagine her people speak a Nilo-Saharan language related to those of Chad, South Sudan, and parts of East Africa. They would essentially descend from Nilo-Saharan peoples who moved into the Sahara when it became a grassland between 7500 and 3000 BC.

Malian Mademoiselle

Malian Mademoiselle

C’est une belle mademoiselle du Mali, as the French would say. Which might either be fitting or ironic considering the French conquered Mali, along with large chunks of the rest of West and Central Africa. Which wouldn’t have been such a positive development for the most part, but the silver lining is that French pick-up lines would work well on Malian chicks like this one.

Pharaoh’s Mistress Walks In

Pharaoh's Mistress Walks In

This young Egyptian beauty, whom no man other than Pharaoh himself may touch, saunters through the palace during a balmy evening. This character is inspired by the “Pharaoh’s Mistress” Anck-su-namun from the first two Mummy movies, who was Imhotep’s lover and partner-in-crime in his big power grab. In fact, the gold/orange tint you see here (achieved through a lowered-opacity Overlay layer in Clip Studio Paint) is meant to emulate the lighting in the first movie’s opening scene. It took trial and error to figure it out and I still don’t think I have it right.

Hi-Tech Egyptian Warrior

Hi-Tech Egyptian Warrior

This is a futuristic upgrade for my Egyptian warrior princess Nubkhas. She got her start as a character from ancient times (specifically the year 1990 BC), but then I entertained the possibility of changing her setting to a more hi-tech one (albeit retaining her ancient Egyptian cultural influences). As you can see, I’m still undecided on exactly what I want to do with her.

But if nothing else, I rather like this concept of an Egyptian warrior princess from the future.