Anput the Embalming Goddess

AnputThis is my interpretation of Anput, an Egyptian goddess who presided over embalming and mummification. She was the wife of the jackal-masked Anpu (better known as Anubis), with whom she had their daughter Kebechet (goddess of embalming fluid). Here, she’s holding one of the four canopic jars which held the deceased’s organs during the mummification process.

Advertisements

Nefrusheri – Futuristic Redesign

Nefrusheri Redesign

Inspired by the “Afrofuturism” movement, I’ve been toying with the idea of giving my original character Nefrusheri a futuristic redesign. She’d still be an Egyptian warrior princess, but from the future—that is, an alternate future where the ancient Egyptian civilization (aka Kemet) is still going strong. Not only would more advanced technology allow the characters to do things that they couldn’t do with Bronze Age tech, but it also lets me give Nefrusheri an affinity for hip-hop. Because I just love the idea of a rapping Egyptian princess!

Futuristic Egyptian War Chariot

Futuristic Egyptian Chariot

This is a design for a futuristic Egyptian vehicle, based on their ancient war chariots. I owe a lot of my inspiration here to the “Afrofuturism” movement, which sets out to combine pre-colonial African and Afro-Diasporan cultural influences with futuristic and science-fiction themes. I don’t normally do futuristic stuff like this, but this was nonetheless a fun concept to design.

Nefrusheri’s Bust

Nefrusheri's Bust

This is a sketchbook portrait of my original character Nefrusheri. She was this Egyptian (or pseudo-Egyptian) warrior princess I created for a fantasy story wherein she had to retrieve a magic staff stolen by the Chinese (or pseudo-Chinese). Unfortunately, I am still stumped on the plotting process, but I don’t want to give up on it since I’ve given up on way too many projects in the past. Somehow I am going to figure out how to make it work!

Egyptian Queen of China

Egyptian Queen of China

This character would be a woman from ancient Egypt who has married into the imperial family of China after a long journey across the Indian Ocean. Her story was inspired by that of Queen Ankhesenamun, who was Pharaoh Tutankhamun’s chief wife. After Tut died and his vizier Ay took over, Ankhesenamun’s known to have requested a husband from the Hittites of Anatolia, only for the man they sent to die en route. It’s likely that Ay and his goons had something to do with that.

It makes me think Ankhesenamun really didn’t want to be Ay’s wife, so what if she fled the country afterward? For all we know, she could have very well traveled all the way to China and married into the ruling Shang dynasty. Right now, though, her fate remains a mystery of ancient history…

By the way, the characters on the upper right spell “Egyptian” in Chinese.

Isis Across Cultures

Redrawing something I did over a year ago…

Isis Across Cultures V2

This is a split portrait of the goddess Isis (or Auset) as she would have been seen in the different cultures that venerated her. On the left is the original Egyptian and Kushite portrayal or her, whereas on the right is the version the Greeks and Romans adopted after incorporating Egypt into their empires. In both cases, the goddess would have been represented in the image of her human disciples. It’s a bit like how Jesus’s appearance in art changes from Middle Eastern to European, African, etc. depending on the culture depicting him.

Egyptian Hair Protection

Egyptian Hair Protection

This woman from ancient Egypt has her hair covered with linen cloth to protect it from the sand and dust of the Sahara. It’s similar to an African-American do-rag, and there are Egyptian tomb paintings of men wearing similar headwraps while winnowing grain. And given the ancient Egyptian fondness for styling their hair (especially into braids and dreadlocks), they must have felt a similar need to protect and maintain it. We know people throughout Africa and the African Diaspora (e.g. African-Americans and Afro-Caribbeans) wear wraps of cloth around their hair for that purpose, so maybe the Egyptians did as well?

By the way, if you’re seeing weird lines in her skin, those are dents in the sketchbook paper from an earlier drawing. Unfortunately, not all sketchbook paper is equally robust.

Egyptian-Style Nunchucks!

Today’s theme is going to be Egyptian warrior babes wielding nunchucks!

Nefrusheri's NunchucksTakhi Has the Chucks

In all seriousness, nunchucks (or nunchaku) actually originated from the island of Okinawa which lies between Japan and Taiwan. They started out as an agricultural tool before being modified into a lethal defensive weapon in the martial arts. But the idea of Egyptian warrior babes wielding nunchucks was too awesome to pass up.