Acrocanthosaurus

Acrocanthosaurus

The meat-eating dinosaur Acrocanthosaurus atokensis prowls the forests of North America between 116 and 110 million years ago, during the Early Cretaceous Period. Though almost as big as Trex, Acrocanthosaurus would have been more closely related to the earlier Allosaurus and even more so to the Giganotosaurus and Carcharodontosaurus. However, it would have stood apart from most of its cousins with the high, possibly hump-like “ridge” that ran down its neck and back.
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Paradise Lost

Paradise Lost

66 million years ago in South America, at the very end of the Cretaceous Period, a pair of titanosaurian sauropods look up from the jungle canopy to witness the biggest shooting star they have ever witnessed. Little can they fathom that the verdant paradise they call home is about to be lost in the upcoming catastrophe.

The dinosaurs here are based on the Dreadnoughtus schrani, a South American titanosaur from the Late Cretaceous that may have been the heaviest dinosaur yet discovered. Its maximum weight would have been around 42 tons.

Moros intrepidus

Moros intrepidus

Moros intrepidus was a meat-eating dinosaur that hunted in North America a little over 96 million years ago, near the beginning of the Late Cretaceous Period. Although nimbly built and weighing 172 lbs (similar to a modern-day leopard), Moros would have belonged to the group of theropod dinosaurs known as Tyrannosauroidea, and it could very well have been ancestral to the famous Tyrannosaurus rex and other larger tyrannosaurids. Since it may represent the arrival of tyrannosaur ancestors into North America from eastern Asia, it was named after an embodiment of impending doom in Greek mythology.

T. rex Head On

T. rex Head On

Tyrannosaurus rex looks at you head on with an open maw. Those are indeed big teeth in there, ranging as long as one foot in length! Combine that with the most powerful jaws of any land carnivore, and you have a recipe for dealing death to almost any creature with a single bite!

The Lion Queen

The Lion Queen

She hunts on the savanna beside her loyal lionesses, who are as sisters to her.

This is another Frank Frazetta-inspired piece, of course, but you might also see a bit of similarity to the character of Sadatina from Milton Davis’s sword-and-soul novel Woman of the Woods. It’s an alright book for the most part, although I did think there wasn’t enough of the lioness “sisters” in it.

Kratotyrannus imperator

kratotyrannus imperator

This is a concept for a fantasy species of tyrannosaurid dinosaur, which I have named Kratotyrannus imperator (“powerful tyrant emperor”). It’s supposed to be a slightly larger and even more powerful and fierce-looking cousin of the Tyrannosaurus rex, either descended from the latter (if the Cretaceous/Paleogene extinction were to never happen) or an analog from a totally fictional world. Whichever it is, Kratotyrannus is beyond doubt the apex predator of its native habitat, using its bone-shattering jaws to slay almost any big game animal with a single bite.

Brontosaurus by the River

Brontosaurus by the River

A thirsty Brontosaurus excelsus lumbers towards a river on a hot and steamy Jurassic afternoon around 150 million years ago. This is an illustration inspired by an old documentary with stop-motion dinosaurs which I had on VHS as a kid. One of the scenes had a Brontosaurus lumbering towards a body of water, presumably either to drink or wade through it (the documentary was made in the time when artists still reconstructed sauropod dinosaurs as semi-aquatic like hippopotamuses). Consider this a modern-style tribute to that old video.

Alaskan Pachyrhinosaurs

Alaskan Pachyrhinosaurs

It’s a balmy summer day in Late Cretaceous Alaska around 70 million years ago, and these Pachyrhinosaurus perotorum are out to enjoy their stroll in the woods. Back in the hothouse days of the Mesozoic Era, the polar regions would have experienced a temperate climate like that of the modern American Midwest or most of Europe. It still would have snowed in the winter, but there were probably no polar ice caps in that time.

Thanos the Dinosaur

Thanos the Dinosaur

This is my depiction of Thanos simonattoi, an abelisaurid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Brazil. Although known only from scrappy remains at present, this dinosaur is remarkable primarily because its discoverers named it after the Marvel supervillain Thanos. Personally, I don’t care for the name since it might have people confuse the animal for the fictional character, but there’s not really much I can do about that.