Isis the Enchantress

This is the digitally colored version of something I posted earlier…

Isis the Enchantress

Isis, who is perhaps the most famous of all the Egyptian goddesses, is ready to cast one of her magic spells. According to Egyptian mythology, she obtained her powers after learning the sun god Ra’s “secret name” (since the Egyptians believed learning a person’s secret name would allow you to control them magically), but for the most part she would use them for benevolent purposes such as healing and protection. This helped make Isis one of the most popular deities in the whole Egyptian pantheon in ancient times; even the Greeks and Romans would adopt her into their own religions.

A few Egyptian goddesses

Isis Casts a SpellIsis, who is perhaps the most famous of all the Egyptian goddesses, is casting one of her magic spells. According to Egyptian mythology, she apparently got her powers after learning the sun god Ra’s “secret name” (since the Egyptians believed learning a person’s secret name would allow you to control them magically), but for the most part she would use them for benevolent purposes such as healing and protection. This helped make Isis one of the most popular deities in the whole Egyptian pantheon in ancient times; even the Greeks and Romans would adopt her into their own religions.

Hathor II

This is another take of mine on Hathor, the Egyptian goddess of feminine love, beauty, and fertility. You can think of her as the Egyptian equivalent of the Greek Aphrodite or the Roman Venus. She’s also the goddess best known for her cow motif, although Isis could also take on a bovine form in some depictions.

The last time I drew Hathor, I thought her face came out too wonky for some reason, so I took another stab at depicting her with a somewhat “sexier” pose.

Nephthys 2007Nephthys (also known as Nebthet) was a protective goddess of the dead, nighttime, and rivers in the ancient Egyptian pantheon. She was also the sister of Isis, the wife of Set, and the mother of the jackal-masked Anubis. After Set murdered Osiris in the famous Egyptian myth of Horus, it was Nephthys who helped Isis recover Osiris’s scattered body parts (she was also Isis’s nursemaid for the infant Horus). In allusion to her role as protector of the dead, I’ve given Nephthys some linen mummy wrappings as part of her dress (e.g. her hair-wrap).

Sekhmet With Colored Pencils
This is a drawing of Sekhmet, the Egyptian goddess of war and violence, which I colored using a new set of colored pencils. Someone suggested that I dip my pencils into water first, and that trick seems to have smoothed out the coloring even though the pencils aren’t technically watercolor.

Ma’at the Goddess of Justice

Ma'at the Goddess of Justice

In the ancient Egyptian worldview, Ma’at was a concept representing truth, justice, and order in the universe. It formed the basis of morality that every Egyptian citizen had to follow and every Pharaoh had to uphold. Sometimes the Egyptians would represent Ma’at as a goddess wearing an ostrich feather under her headband. This feather was a symbol of truth against which the hearts of the dead would be weighed on a scale; only if the heart weighed less than the feather could the dead enter the afterlife.

Hathor

Hathor

Hathor, the Egyptian goddess of love, beauty, and fertility, takes a stroll amidst the fields of Aaru (which was essentially the Egyptian conception of heaven). The staff she’s carrying is called a was-scepter, and it’s believed to represent power and authority. Both gods and kings could be portrayed as wielding the was-scepter in Egyptian art.

Blasian War Goddess

Blasian War Goddess

This ferocious war goddess is supposed to represent a theological fusion between the Egyptian Sekhmet (known for her big cat motif) and the Hindu Kali. To go along with this, her ancestry would be a mixture of African and Southeast Asian, or “Blasian” (Black/Asian). If the ancient Egyptian religion were to spread into Southeast Asia and intermix with the local Hindu-influenced faith, they might imagine a war goddess very similar to this.

Wrath of Sekhmet

rage-of-sekhmet

Sekhmet, the Egyptian goddess of war, has just gone through a destructive rampage. One Egyptian story claims that the sun god Ra sent Sekhmet down to punish some mortals who conspired against him, but when her rampage went out of control to the point of nearly destroying humanity, Ra had to get her drunk with beer dyed red to look like blood. As would have befitted her role, Sekhmet had as her animal totem the lioness, which would have been among the most formidable predators known to the ancient Egyptians.

Rite of Bastet

rite-of-bastet

Bastet, the ancient Egyptian goddess of music, is perfectly at home performing this ritual dance. I wanted the background to look like a nighttime celebration, with the flames coming from something like a village bonfire. If this piece had a soundtrack, I imagine it would be intense and jubilant drumming.